art and healing Blog

Art heals yourself, others, community and the earth


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Exclusive Interview With Ram Dass | Marianne Schnall

RD: I hope they will take away that their primary identity is spiritual, that they are a spiritual being visiting humanity. I hope when they come away from my writings that they can believe in the kind of beings that my Guru represents. I hope they see that our minds put us in little boxes of separateness. I hope that they will see how they have been fooled by their incarnation.

RD: Books of scientists, like for example, there was something written by a very important brain scientist, and he said God’s not going to go away, because there are places in the brain that only pick out the higher consciousness and those places in the brain, that’s the spirit too. In my vision, we are really two people. We are the ego, which is the human being, and the soul, which is the spiritual side. When I identify with my soul there is so much love and it is just, “Yum, yum, yum, yum.”

RD: Books of scientists, like for example, there was something written by a very important brain scientist, and he said God’s not going to go away, because there are places in the brain that only pick out the higher consciousness and those places in the brain, that’s the spirit too. In my vision, we are really two people. We are the ego, which is the human being, and the soul, which is the spiritual side. When I identify with my soul there is so much love and it is just, “Yum, yum, yum, yum.”

via Exclusive Interview With Ram Dass | Marianne Schnall.


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About | Nahko and Medicine for the People

About | Nahko and Medicine for the People

Oregon-native Nahko, born a mix of Apache, Puerto Rican, and Filipino cultures and adopted into an American family, suffered an identity crisis from an early age. But the unifying power of music entered his life as a healing remedy, when he took up the piano at age six. Armed with his newfound talent, he set out to bridge the cultural gaps dividing his own psyche and began producing a public, musical journal of his journey toward personal, spiritual, and communal healing.

From his hometown of Portland to the shores of Hawaii or Bali, wherever he has traveled, Nahko is joined by a tribe of culturally alienated truth seekers for whom Nahko’s story resonates with their own, and who find redemption in his voice, guitar, flute, and drum. Whether solo or with the dynamic group of musical troubadours known as “Medicine for the People,” Nahko delivers a soulful dose of curative vibrations that moves audiences to dance, laugh, and cry. His ‘spirited redemption music’ lays bear the scars of cultural wounds, environmental wrongs, and social injustices. His lyrics bear the burden of heavy messages, but the load is lightened by agile melodies and driving rhythms that coerce all who bear witness into spirited, purifying, movement. His humor disarms, and his lyrical stories open listeners to the power of “Real Talk Music”—songs that reveal an honesty and depth so raw, it inspires an internal revival that echoes out into the world. Sometimes exuberant, sometimes savage, but always transformational, Nahko makes the movement move.

via About | Nahko and Medicine for the People.


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Mission | Nahko and Medicine for the People

MissionOur Mission is to be the motivation and inspiration for all that has come to be Medicine for the People. Within our community we have everything we need to spread awareness and take action to make the Changes we know are healthy for all Earthlings and Mother Gaia herself. We are honored and humbled to be a force of attraction for positive and creative minds in these times. With your trust and guidance we accept this role and speak our prayer of intention to take Direct Action! …Hoka Hey …”Today is agood day to die” … and perhaps with your help a better day to live. Thank you for your love and support.

via Mission | Nahko and Medicine for the People.


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Book me | Allison Warden a.k.a. AKU-MATU

“Ode to the Polar Bear” is a half-hour, one-woman show that highlights one Inupiaq woman’s perspective on global warming and the fate of Alaska’s Polar Bear.  It has a multi-media aspect (projected photographs), music, and original costumes.  The show can be done without the projected photos, and an audience participation element (holding a cup of ice) can also be incorporated.  The show has gotten rave reviews and recieved a standing ovation at the Last Frontier Theatre Conference in May of 2008.  Allison would be happy to take this performance on the road to your organization.  Space needs for the show are minimal.

via Book me | Allison Warden a.k.a. AKU-MATU.


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Yvette M. Pino | Veteran Artist Program

Yvette joined the Army after the attacks of September 11, 2001. During her two deployments in Iraq with the 101st Airborne Division, she found solitude in creating works of art. But her art also helped boost the morale of her fellow troops earning Yvette the unofficial title of “Division Artist.” After her active duty service, Yvette earned her BFA from the University of Wisconsin – Madison and founded the Veteran Print Project.

via Yvette M. Pino | Veteran Artist Program.


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About | Veteran Print Project

Veteran Print Project is a workshop based-organization whose goal is two-fold: 1. Obtain and develop oral histories of a new generation of veterans 2. To connect local artists, specifically printmakers, with the veterans to create prints based on the oral histories. Through this process a dialogue is started between two very different groups of people. Initially focusing on student veterans and student art programs, Veteran Print Project seeks to challenge young communities to gain a broader understanding of the veteran experience, both while enlisted and after discharge. Veteran Print Project believes that artist have a unique capability of communicating history visually. It is the goal of Veteran Print Project to assist in the development of these “Pict-Oral” histories and to display the creative energies that result from the collaboration between two iconic groups- artist and veteran.

via About | Veteran Print Project.


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StageQ

Local artist Yvette Pino, founder of Veterans Art Project, will be printing t-shirts onsite allowing the audience to find their personal testimonial of strength. T-shirts will be printed with the words “Let Your Spirit…” Audience members will be able to pick from several words (such as sing, grow, heal, evolve, and dance) to finish their testimonial of strength.

via StageQ.


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StageQ/Rape Crisis Center’s “Surviving, Hope & Surrendering”, Bartell Theatre, Madison, WI

“I felt called to do a performance like this. Even though I’ll be very exposed in one sense, showing my own vulnerability, will help others trapped by their past,” says Sandy Andersen. “I want to help people find their voice and move beyond whatever has happened to them in their lives so that they can be freer and happier.”

“Surviving, Hoping and Surrendering” is comprised of both stories and songs, some original compositions while others are adaptations of current music. It is a show in three Acts:

— Act One is about survival. Sandy explores how she overcame her personal trauma.

— Act Two is about hope. Starting back in her childhood, Sandy reflects on her own vocal evolution from Pat Benatar wannabe to musical theater talent to a respected opera performer and back again.

— Act Three is about surrendering. Sandy shows the joy of letting go and the beauty of enjoying each moment.

via StageQ/Rape Crisis Center’s “Surviving, Hope & Surrendering”, Bartell Theatre, Madison, WI.


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Q&A with dance and movement therapist Donna Newman-Bluestein – Health & wellness – The Boston Globe

Q&A with dance and movement therapist Donna Newman-Bluestein - Health & wellness - The Boston Globe

What I’m doing as a therapist is dancing with everyone in the group and making repeated individual connections with people. I mirror the way they use space or their rhythms and pace, connecting them to the group as a whole. I’m seeing very small movements and reflecting that back. When a person sees their movement mirrored, they feel like they’re having an impact. It’s empowering and dispels that sense of isolation. The emotional component is central. The relationship is what’s healing, and dance is the language, the medium that allows for the relationship.

via Q&A with dance and movement therapist Donna Newman-Bluestein – Health & wellness – The Boston Globe.